Film Education


INTERVIEW WITH BUDDING FILMMAKER NEMIL SHAH

Nemil image

lead image

Introducing Hasan Khan                                                   Omkar Sakpal

 

“As a first time Director I was nervous shooting in uncontrolled public spaces in Dharavi. I had the notion that the slum people of Dharavi would be hostile but I realised how judgemental and wrong I was. They were very gracious and co-operative, many times they went out of their way to help and that was s big reason for the success of my film”

INTERVIEW

Oorvazi Irani Interviews

Nemil Shah – IBDP student batch 2015-17

It was exactly two years ago, when I joined Oorvazi Maam’s film class in the SVKM JV Parekh International School to discover a whole new different world of CINEMA and here I am today after two years where I actually discovered myself. I always say and will keep saying that she helped ‘me’ to find ‘me’ out of ‘me’.

1. Has your idea of filmmaking changed and how from the first day of class studying film as a subject offered by the International Baccalaureate ?

Definitely, I mean to me filmmaking was always very appealing and fascinating form of art because of the combination of the audio as well as visuals. What has changed is that now I call it as the ’Language of films’.

2. How do you define art and an artist? 

An artist could be any normal people who can express and reflect their own selves. This reflection is what I perceive as art.

3. Which filmmakers do you look up to?

Satyajit Ray, Alfred Hitchcock, Ritesh Batra.

4. Is there a rel between the form of poetry and film as art and how? 

The visuals and imagery is what bring these two different arts closer. However there are no restrictions in art. Therefore any art form can be expressed with respect to the choice of the artist.

5. As a teacher do you feel I have a unique approach to the subject? What did you like and dislike? 

The practical approach is what I feel was very helpful because that is what helped us to bring out the ‘art’ in us. What I like and dislike is the fact that you reply to us faster than we do…

6. What kind of films do you aspire to make?

Experimental Art films as well as Drama.

7. Why do you aspire to be a filmmaker? 

It’s the language in which I can express myself quiet well.

8. What has the greatest deepest lesson making your first short film teach you?

It is rigorous, painful, stressful etc. etc. but this is what makes me happy. This process is what I love.

9. What to your mind is the future of cinema?

Art often comes with no or very little expectations.

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IB Film Experience: Altamash Jaleel

The IB film experience

by Altamash Jaleel

SVKM IBDP Film Class 2010-12

I began IB film with no expectations, the same way I used to before starting anything new. It came as a part of my policy. Well, the experience has only strengthened my belief with the passage of time. That’s because this particular course necessitates exploring, passing through the uncharted, unfamiliar territories. And it has been, without a shred of doubt, the most fantastic learning experience. And it’s all kudos to Ms Oorvazi Irani for instilling the persistence, resilience and tact required to handle the subject of film within the 4 students that occupied a quiet classroom.

Those three hours of continuous discussion were gruelling, not to mention the amount of books and documents based on film research we had to handle! But the important thing was that every lesson bore fruit and that’s the lesson we will always have as a keepsake.

The course and assignments:

 I think the course is very well systemized to equip students with foundation skills in filmic analysis and appreciation. For those who learn to appreciate films and respect the various layers in meaning of a film realize that watching a film is not just a visual, rather, a visceral experience.

After completing the various assignments like the Oral Analysis and Independent Study, I found myself examining films in a very different light. It’s amazing how you find yourself talking for fifteen minutes about any film scene that barely lasted for 5 minutes, as we were expected to perform for the oral analysis. I was fortunate to analyse the famed café sequence from Casablanca, as the radiant Ingrid Bergman marks her entry, half an hour into the film. On the other hand is the independent study which challenges your filmic knowledge about a subject of your interest and then demands you to write a creative script for a documentary based on that knowledge. I extensively explored the genre of Westerns (cowboy flicks) and wrote a creative documentary for that.

The sheer amount of learning in this course is fascinating and one ends up coupling all these faculties in the most important and exciting assignment of all – the 7 minute film. Speaking for our class, as first-time filmmakers, we were faced with a terribly daunting task. But through persistence and reflecting upon our shortcomings did we manage to craft a film which would mark a new cornerstone for the films that our school had produced.

The IBDP Film Class 2010-12, under the informal banner of ‘Half-ticket Productions’ produced a film with a lot of heart and were fortunate to have received the compliments of our teacher, Miss Oorvazi. What an unforgettable experience! And it transformed me not only as a lover of the cinema but more deeply struck a chord within me as an individual trying to make sense of the complex world.

Conclusion:

 I took Film as a mere interest, but it slowly translated into a passion. And that’s the credit that IB Film and the teacher and everyone else involved deserve, in supplementing this course for the students. I think I can sum up my love for filmmaking by a quote by the venerable Winston Churchill – ‘Success is not final, failure is not fatal, it is the courage to continue that counts’.